Research‎ > ‎

Polarization Resolved Microscopy

Abstract

Light transmiting in the space can be described by electromagnetic wave, and polarization indicates the amplitude direction of electric field. In biology, some kind of bio-tissue (ex : collagen) or cell structure will induce the change of polarization. Therefore, we can realize the character of some bio-sample by observe the interaction between light and bio-tissue.

We develop the polarization system of four channel time-resolved Stokes meter to detect the polarization change with time, and by using the inverse matrix to reconstruct the time-resolved Mueller matrix of the sample. In this matrix, we can define the degree of depolarization in the bio-sample, and observe the fluorescence lifetime changing with the different polarized incident light. In this case, we can get the more accurate anisotropy to demonstrate the molecular dynamics.



principle 

At present,optical polarization state is described by two mathematical vectors Jones vector and Stokes vector.Jones vector is proposed by R Clark Jones in 1941.The light in the medium of propagation is composed by electric and magnetic field oscillations.Jones vector is composed by horizontal and vertical electric field vector component.Stokes parameters is real vector composed by light intensity of four different polarization.

I is light intensity.α and β are linear polarization .γ is circular polarization
Degree of polarization is

Π = ( α2 + β2 + γ2 ) 1/2 ≦ 1  

For Jones calculus observing sample of complete and incomplete polarization has great reaction.If incomplete polarization incident a sample , Jones vector can't exact describe electric field and phase changing.In expressing polarization state , Stokes vector and Mueller matrix are more clearly expression.The relation of incident light and outgoing light , we can express following formula.

 

Sout=MSin


M links Sout and Sin. And it is composed by 4*4 matrix.



Experimental setup 


Application 

  1. The Stokesmeter can provide more informations in observing anisotropic bio-samples.
  2. We can calculate the stokes vector of the fluorescence after the sample by measuring the output intensity, and build the Mueller matrix of the sample.
  3. Time-resolved polarization information on scattering light or fluorescence can be applied to observe the molecule motivation.

RELATED publications

  1. Nirmal Mazumder, Lu Yun Xiang, Jianjun Qiu and Fu-Jen Kao, Investigating starch gelatinization through Stokes vector resolved second harmonic generation microscopy, Scientific Reports 7:45816 (2017). (pdf)
  2. Nirmal Mazumder, Lu Yun Xiang, Jianjun Qiu and Fu-Jen Kao*, Corrigendum: Investigating starch gelatinization through Stokes vector resolved second harmonic generation microscopy, Scientific Reports 7:46803 (2017). (pdf)
  3. Nirmal Mazumder, Chih-Wei Hu, Jianjun Qiu, Matthew R. Foreman, Carlos Macías Romero, Peter Török, and Fu-Jen Kao, Revealing molecular structure and orientation with Stokes vector resolved second harmonic generation microscopy, Methods, 2013 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2013.07.019 )
  4. Nirmal Mazumder, Jianjun Qiu, Matthew R. Foreman, Carlos Macías Romero, Chih-Wei Hu, Han-Ruei Tsai, Peter Tӧrӧk, and Fu-Jen KaoPolarization-resolved Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy with a four-channel Stokes-polarimeter, Optics Express, Vol. 20, Iss. 13, pp. 14090–14099 (2012),http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.014100 . Also selected for the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics (VJBO), Editor Andrew Dunn and Anthony Durkin, Vol. 7, Iss. 8, August 2, 2012.